Untranslated Love — Vita Brevis

My poem “Untranslated Love” published in Vita Brevis

give me the stars

that shine under the bridges

where poor children spend their nights

the blood that leaks from wounds of war

when the last piece of bread is turned in tar

 

give me the language of your alabaster gestures

the guilty passion of Tristan for Queen Isolde

the mystery of painted nudes on walls

the cries of nuns under an angel’s lacerated wing

your untranslated love coiled in a tarnished ring

Submitted by short-prose-fiction give me the stars that shine under the bridges where poor children spend their nights the blood that leaks from wounds of war when the last piece of bread is turned in tar give me the language of your alabaster gestures the guilty passion of Tristan for Queen Isolde the mystery […]

via Untranslated Love — Vita Brevis

 

 

56 thoughts on “Untranslated Love — Vita Brevis

  1. Good morning. Congratulations. This poem is so deserving of this merit and much more. The star and heavens is where you beautiful, inspiring poetry belongs. Today, your poetry is published, someday your novel. Congrats dear friend, I am very happy for you.

     
    1. Good morning, Drew! Thank you so much for your wonderful words! I am flattered that you think so highly of my work!

       
      1. Ayyyy… Thank you for asking! Working on… trying to find the time to finish…. too many things going on in my life now. Maybe I will it ready next summer. Try to some put leche in your coffee 🙂 🙂 🙂

         
      2. Sorry to hear about that. I am having the same problem with my novel about reincarnation and eternal love. I hope things calm down for both of us so we can finish them. As for the coffee, one sugar but too much coffee, I will be energetic today with this caffeine overload.

         
      3. Looking forward to reading your novel when ready!
        Do you think that drinking coffee will help me finish sooner? Looking for advise 🙂

         
      4. LOL Time. That is the only thing that will help us finish our work, Time. I am planning my next vacation to get away from the blog and write. I want to be the first to read yours. Waiting for your next excerpt.

         
      5. Thank you for saying that! I should do the same. And probably I will.
        A new excerpt will come next week.
        Ah.. your coffee’s getting cold 🙂

         
  2. Congratulations! One of the very strong poems. Every time I am surprised because I discover new aspects /. For example, I paid attention to the random rhyme pairs
    war / tar
    wing / ring
    Good example of amplification the suggestion / mark for good poetry!
    Thank you for sharing!

     
  3. So much touch of pain in d poem but written beautifully ,my dear friend!! I like epical stories as you have discribed about it “the guilty passion of Tristan for Queen Isolde……..your untraslated love coiled in a tarnished ring”.uff.many years had passed but all love story is still alive. Most beautiful discription of untraslated love.my heart’s wish is -i may shar your poem on my blog in other shape.do you agree dear.!!🌹🌹🌹firstly ,i congratulate you with heart for publishing dis poem in Vita Brevis.marvellous dear W.💐💐💐💐💐🌼

     
    1. my dear friend, thank you so much for your wonderful words! Of course you can share my poem on your blog. I do not have a reblog button (Haha! I destroyed it myself, but I hope you can find a way to share it). May you have a marvelous day!

       
      1. Vaah.your lovely words are as beautiful gift for me,my dear kind hearted friend!!so much thanks with love,and most most welcome,dear!!😊🐥🐥🐥🐥💐💐💐💐🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹

         
      2. Hey dear friend W.!! I have rewritten your post”untranslated love”, and published it.plz see my post based on your post.is it right?if you don’t like it then i will delete it.thanks for your kindness.💕💕💕

         
      3. My dear friend, please see the comment that I left on your post. It tells you how to post content from other bloggers.

         
  4. Good morning! Sorry to be a day late with my response. Congratulations on the publication of this piece. Writing like this deserves to be put out there as much as possible. I even noticed something new in this reading; all of the things the speaker asks for are nonverbal (except the cries of the nuns, and even those aren’t necessarily distinct words). Even the language of the alabaster gestures is nonverbal because, even though it is a language, it’s one of gestures, not words. It points to the idea that the deepest truths are the ones left unspoken because there aren’t words to do them justice. Such a deep poem that I love coming back to.

     
    1. Good afternoon, David! Thank you so much for the congrats, for the praise, and for your analysis. Indeed, I tried to use “nonverbal language.” You are the only one who noticed that. I am thrilled you did!
      Nothing to be sorry about. Enjoy your summer, and thank you again!

       
      1. I’m trying, but the summer is almost over, and…
        Have a fabulous evening!

         

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