the naked maja #poetry

i waltz into an empty ballroom

like the ghost of Maja haunting Goya’s dreams*

aquatic lusts fly in the air

(the desperation of the birds caged in your soul)

i follow their music

i choke

where are they coming from?

through the cracking floors

you blow erotic tongues of fumes

i am not desnuda anymore

around my body

yearning cobwebs bloom

 

*Reference to Goya’s painting La maja desnuda (The Naked Maja)

 

28 thoughts on “the naked maja #poetry

    1. Haha! Are you in Santo Domingo? Because if you are my first comment here comes from Santo Domingo😊 Thank you so much for your words and enjoy your vacation!!!!

       
      1. Thank you again! I am running errands now. Looking forward to reading your post when I get home!

         
    1. Thank you so much!!!!! Lots of hearts to you!!! Are you ok with the Knight of Hearts? 🙂 Or you want the King? 🙂

       
  1. ah, thin thread erotically painted with words!
    Oh yeah … Maya’s dance under the flute of Krishna creates ethereal glitter on the moon under the thousands of veils.

     
    1. Thank you so much for your wonderful words! But there is no flute of Krishna here. Just a waltz. Well, I am kidding 🙂 Thank you kindly for your comment.

       
  2. G, once again I learn something about culture from reading your work. I’d never heard of this painting before I followed your link, but I still say you’ve done an excellet job of deconstructing and expanding the sexual/sensual nature of the work. I’ll admit it’s taking me some time to figure out what “aquatic lusts” is referring to. However, since “aquatic” indicates water, and the next line mentions a cage in the soul (which seems to signify suppressed emotion), I’m going to guess the aquatic lusts and the caged birds are tears. The caged emotion escaping in an aquatic form. If so, the metaphor is not only beautifully creative, it also fits well with the poem’s mournful ending. It seems that the yearning being expressed isn’t acted upon, since the speaker is no longer desnuda, and is covered in cobwebs (suggesting an extended lack of care). Sad, but moving. Considering a clothed version of the same painting was created later, I’m also thinking the ending was an exploration of the second painting in relation to the first? As ever, very well done.

     
    1. David, thank you for taking the time to write such a thoughtful comment. “I’m going to guess the aquatic lusts and the caged birds are tears. ” You are right on the money. I think (if I can deconstruct myself when it comes to poetry) I wanted to suggest the loneliness of pure sexuality (I am waltzing naked into an empty ballroom) versus a more spiritual aspect of love which eradicates/tames the feeling of being lonely ( you blow erotic tongues of fumes i.e somehow you are with me, and I am not naked anymore). However, I admit that the use of the word “cobweb” is very tricky. I understand how people feel about cobwebs 🙂 Therefore I wanted to introduce an adjective there “soft, scintillating …” . And probably I should. Otherwise it does suggest sadness, lack of care… “the ending was an exploration of the second painting in relation to the first?” yes, the sexual aspect of love versus a more spiritual aspect. I am not saying that this is what Goya intended. This is what I intended. Obviously, I wasn’t successful, and I came up with something else 🙂 Thank you again! I am thrilled by your comment!

       
      1. You’re welcome, I’m happy to know you enjoyed it! “I wanted to suggest the loneliness of pure sexuality versus a more spiritual aspect of love which eradicates/tames the feeling of being lonely.” That makes a lot of sense in retrospect. The covering is an act of love from the other person, a love that provides. I do think having something like “scintillating” before “cobwebs” might have helped the positivity come through more on the first read. Still, looking at it again, the word “bloom” does suggest life and is generally a positive word, so I can see where the more intimate ending was present and I just missed it. 🙂

         
      2. Thank you, David. I highly appreciate you reading again! Have a fabulous weekend! (could you please let me know when you post?)

         
      3. I apologize for interfering in your dialogue, but “Obviously, I was not successful” is not obvious at all. Of course, every reader and definitely the author has a right to interpretation, especially in poems that are “free” are without punctuation. It is the multiplicity of interpretation that makes this type of writing, beloved, naturally, as well as this poem! My personal interpretation of the final, oh, I really like this final!
        i am not desnuda anymore
        around my body
        yearning cobwebs bloom

        the cobweb is not ordinary. respectively, and the weaver of this cobweb. “longing” is the right word in the context of the poem. In this case, this web has the function of covering the naked body as a thin veil, which enhances the attraction. Goya dresses her model, but the painting does not lose anything. The model is always mysterious and attractive.

         
      4. Dear B, I do not mind at all. I welcome the discussion. I hope David does too. “the cobweb is not ordinary. respectively, and the weaver of this cobweb.” I fully agree. “In this case, this web has the function of covering the naked body as a thin veil, which enhances the attraction.” I feel that too. But also the cobweb is the covering in front of love, or by love itself as in “I get covered in (by) your love.”

        I am thrilled you liked the final. Thank you so much!!!! While I think “longing” is the right word – I already made that decision :)- I still think that adding an additional adjective will make the end brighter meaning will allow love to flow better! Thank you again for taking the time to read and comment! I greatly respect your opinion (I hope you know that :))

         
      5. Oh, a great honor for me is your comment and your opinion on my views. I think that whatever definition you give to love, it will be true. I do not know anyone has been able to make an accurate description. Ah, otherwise the poets will write for what? Thank you again. The pleasure of such discussions is highly appreciated!

         
      6. Like G, I also find additional discussion welcome, hardly an interference. I also fully agree with the sentiment here. The “multiplicity of interpretation” creates the possibility for discussion, which is a big part of giving life to a piece, certainly not a failure on the author’s part.

         

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